Change Alley

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Eco-Towns: The Official Version

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lego town
Here are the official details of the shortlisted sites, from the Department for Communities and Local Government web site:
– Pennbury, Leicestershire: 12-15,000 homes on a development incorporating brownfield, greenfield and surplus public sector land. Four miles south east of Leicester. This proposal could include 4,000 new affordable houses in an area of high affordability pressure.

– Manby and Strubby, Lincolnshire: 5,000 homes put forward by East Lindsey District Council on two sites, with large elements of brownfield land including a former RAF base. The proposal complements the strategic plan for the phased relocation of communities on Lincolnshire coast because of high flood risk, and could include 1,500 affordable homes in an area of very high affordability pressure.

– Curborough, Staffordshire: 5,000 homes on the brownfield site of the former Fradley airfield, ten miles from Burton. The proposal could include 2,000 affordable houses in an area of very high affordability pressure.

– Middle Quinton, Warwickshire: 6,000 homes on a former Royal Engineers depot which has a rail link to the Worcester-London rail line. Six miles South West of Stratford upon Avon. The proposal could include 2,000 affordable houses in an area of very high affordability pressure.

– Bordon-Whitehill, Hampshire: 5-8,000 homes on a site owned by the Ministry of Defence. A significant number of ex-MoD homes are already on the site, west of Whitehill-Bordon. The proposal could include 2,000 affordable houses in an area of very high affordability pressure.

– Weston Otmoor, Oxfordshire: 10-15,000 homes on a site adjoining the M40 and the Oxford-Bicester railway. Three miles south west of Bicester, the site includes a current airstrip. The scheme could include between 3,000 and 5,000 affordable homes, in an area of extreme affordability pressure.

– Ford, West Sussex: 5,000 homes on a site which includes brownfield land and the former Ford airfield. Close to rail line linking London and the Sussex coast. The scheme could include 1,500 affordable homes, in an area of very high affordability pressure.

– Imerys China Clay Community, Cornwall: Development of around 5,000 homes on former china clay workings, industrial land and disused mining pits no longer needed by owner Imerys. Close to St Austell. The scheme could include 1,500 affordable homes, in an area of extreme affordability pressure.

– Rossington, South Yorkshire: Up to 15,000 homes regenerating the former colliery village of Rossington, three miles south of Doncaster. The scheme could include 1,500 affordable homes, in an area of moderate affordability pressure.

– Coltishall, Norfolk: 5,000 homes on a former RAF airfield, eight miles north of Norwich. The scheme could include 2,000 affordable homes in an area of very high affordability pressure.

– Hanley Grange, Cambridgeshire: 8,000 homes on land adjacent to the A11 designed to improve the severe lack of housing in and around Cambridge. The scheme could include 3,000 affordable homes in an area of extreme affordability pressure.

– Marston Vale and New Marston, Bedfordshire: Up to 15,400 homes on a series of sites, including former industrial sites, along the east-west rail line to Stewartby and Millbrook. The scheme could include 2,000 affordable homes in an area of high affordability pressure.

– Elsenham, Essex: A minimum of 5,000 homes north east of the existing Elsenham village. Close to M11 and the London to Cambridge rail line. The scheme could include 1,800 affordable homes in an area of extreme affordability pressure.

– Rushcliffe, Nottinghamshire: An eco-town proposal was submitted for Kingston-on-Soar, to the south of Nottingham. In response to representations from Rushcliffe Borough Council, this site is not to be pursued. However, the Government is proposing to carry out a further review in partnership with RBC to consider whether there is a suitable alternative location with the potential to be viable within the Rushcliffe local authority area.

– Leeds City Region, Yorkshire: A number of eco-town proposals were submitted for locations within the area of Leeds City Region partnership of 11 authorities and principally between Leeds and Selby. The Leeds City Region Partnership has indicated support in principle for an eco-town within the sub-region. The Partnership has proposed a further study to compare the best alternative locations across the Leeds City Region partnership area. The Government has agreed to support this approach, on the basis that it will allow a further announcement to be made shortly of one or more sites for consultation

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Written by Pete Smith

April 3, 2008 at 10:42 am

2 Responses

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  1. So the ‘eco towns’ are the place of the future? Well the heart is in the right place but the reality of it all is pure politics. If this government or any government of the future is really serious about saving the environment, why do we have a zillion street lights left on all night all over the UK? Why do we have commercial advertising lights blazoning all over our cities , think of Picadilly Circus and multiply it by a zillion. Floodlight sports, formula one racing, rally car racing, etc.,etc.,. The only reason we have to suffer the phoney bleatings of the politicains, aided by the ‘wooly jumper brigade’ harping on about Co2’s, from cars is because they are an easy target for yet more and more taxation. But instead of the usual stealth tax they are casting guilt by identified different sections of the populace in the process. Almost like racism if you have a big car. All cars polute to some degree. If one polutes more than another it only means it takes that little bit longer for the smaller one to polute. I look forward to seeing these so called ‘eco towns’ in operation. Will any fossil fuel driven automobile be banned from their streets? What of buses, lorries, trains and planes. Who will live in them or want to live in them? More to the point will any of our millionaire MP’s live in them? In order to set a good example MP’s should reside in the ‘eco town’ that covers their constiancy. And the best of British….

    John Haynes

    April 4, 2008 at 1:38 pm

  2. You’re right, we can cut down on our energy usage in so many ways, such as turning off unnecessary lights and banning motor racing, but so what? Just because these things aren’t being done, it doesn’t mean we shouldn’t go ahead with building low-impact communities. Who knows, they might actually be very pleasant places to live.
    Please don’t kick off the old “motorists are persecuted” argument here. Personal mobility is a privilege not a right, and you should pay the going rate. One day quite soon you will find you can’t get any more gas for your gas-guzzler, and our traditional urban communities are failing big-time because of energy scarcity. When that happens, you can join the queue to live in an eco-town.

    Pete Smith

    April 5, 2008 at 8:22 am


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